main content starts hereHigh School Course of Study Guide

Mohonasen High School offers a wide array of core courses that help students meet graduation requirements, as well as a broad selection of elective and college-level classes designed to help students find their passion and prepare for life after high school graduation. Use the links below to learn more about what is available to students.

Core Academic Departments

Career and Technical Education (CTE) and the Arts

Course Levels

Mohonasen High School offers three levels of academic study in the core curriculum. The level at which a student studies is determined by previous academic achievement, student interest, application, and teacher recommendations.

  • Honors/Advanced Placement (AP)
    Honors and/or AP courses are offered in English, social studies, math, and science. Acceptance into these courses will be based on student interest by way of completed application, academic achievement, regents exam scores, and teacher recommendation.
  • Regents Prep
    This course of study provides students with an average paced program and moderate supports. Most students complete their math and science requirements in three years, but are encouraged to take more. A majority of the students in the school take this level of courses. Students in Regents Prep may earn Advanced Regents or Regents Diploma.
  • Academic Intervention Services (AIS)
    AIS provides academic support in English and Algebra 1 to provide additional academic support.

College Credit

There are multiple ways to earn college credit during high school. These include:

  • College in the High School (CHS)
    CHS credits are earned by meeting minimum grade (usually a 75+) requirements in the course. Students have an official transcript from the college, but do not need to attend the college to get the credit. However, students should always check with their prospective colleges to be sure that credits transfer and under which category are the awarded credits i.e. electives vs. English vs. Spanish. Our CHS courses are offered through SUNY Schenectady County Community College (SCCC) or Siena College. Additional fees may be required to receive college credit.
  • Advanced Placement
    Advanced Placement Exams are taken in May. They are graded on a scale of 1–5. Each post-secondary institution offers college credit based on its own specific criteria which can vary. The exams cost approximately $95.  Registration for the exams takes place in early November.
  • Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Pre-Engineering courses may be taken for Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) course credit.  Scores on the RIT final exam and the final course average determine eligibility for college credit. Students seeking college course credit through RIT would pay an additional fee of approximately $250.

Core Academic Departments

English

The English program at Mohonasen Central School District is designed to help students reach a level of competency in the New York State Learning Standards for English/Language Arts. This includes students being able to read, write, listen, and speak for: information and understanding; literacy response and expression; critical analysis and evaluation; and social interaction. Development of the use of the writing process and a variety of both classic and contemporary literature will be the primary vehicles for meeting and exceeding these standards.

English 9

The emphasis in this course is on language skills: grammar, vocabulary, usage, mechanics, basic composition, reading skills, and basic literacy forms are studied. Students will write for a variety of audiences and purposes and they will learn how to write literary essays, reviews, summaries, and descriptions. They will review techniques for the research process and produce a multiple–source paper. There will be practice in formal and informal speech. Literature is taught by genre: novel, short story, poetry, and drama. Students will read selections from classic mythology, To Kill a Mockingbird, and Romeo and Juliet, among other texts.
Credit: 1
Grade: 9
Prerequisite: None
Final: Exam

English 9 Honors

The purpose of this course is to offer students an opportunity for enriched studies. Students will complete a number of individual projects and prepare presentations in addition to the work of the core curriculum. Composition is at an advanced level and independent research is required. Emphasis is on excellence of thought and expression. The course is designed to build knowledge, enhance comprehension skills, develop abstract thought processes, and hone critical-thinking skills. A special focus is placed on classical Greek literature.
Credit: 1 Grade: 9
Prerequisite: None
Final: Exam

English 10

English 10 builds upon and extends the work of the previous year. Grammar instruction is focused on sentence structure and word order, complex sentences and phrases, and clause modifiers. Students practice more advanced research skills for multiple-source papers. Literature units introduce comparison and contrast of genres and subjects. Examples of texts use in the course include The Tempest, Of Mice and Men, Animal Farm, as well as poetry and short stories. Emphasis is placed on analysis, interpretation, and concept development.
Credit: 1
Grades: 10
Prerequisite: English 9 or English 9 Honors
Final: Exam

English 10 Honors

In addition to the English 10 Regents course work, students will be required to do extensive independent reading and writing.
Credit: 1
Grades: 10
Prerequisite: English 9 or English 9 Honors
Final: Exam

English 11

The focus is on American literature, which is presented both thematically and chronologically. Students have the opportunity to experience the literature as well as the cultural and historical influences upon major novelists, poets, dramatists, and non–fiction writers. Language studies include regular vocabulary, grammar and usage, mastery of the comparison–contrast essay, resumes, and letter of application. Literary essays and a multiple–source research paper are required. Students are given intensive practice in listening intelligently and writing and speaking clearly, thoughtfully, and correctly. Examples of texts used in the course include Macbeth, The Crucible, Scarlet Letter, and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
Credit: 1
Grades: 11
Prerequisite: English 10 or English 10 Honors
Final: Exam/Writing Project
*Students will take Regents Exam in June.

English 11 Honors

Besides the core curriculum of English 11, students will do an in–depth study and exposition. Increased mastery of English syntax, style, and vocabulary will be emphasized. Class activities include various critical approaches to the exploration of literature, including technique and structure. Students also will participate in reader–response writing and discussion.
Credit: 1
Grades: 11
Prerequisite: English 10 or English 10 Honors
Final: Multi–Genre Writing Portfolio Project
*Students will take Regents Exam in June.

English 12 A/B

English 12 A/B prepares all students for life after high school, whether they are headed to college or straight into the workforce. Each half year course, offered sequentially, allows students to further develop strong and sophisticated reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. Students will read some of the most studied literature of the English language, including short stories, poetry, graphic novels, essays and articles. Students will study works of both classic and modern writers and develop “every day” writing skills – working on college entrance essays, business letters and creative pieces. Class projects will allow students to select and explore a variety of written pieces and writing styles based on their interests.

Credit: .5 credits each
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: English 11 or English 11 Honors

AP English Literature and Composition

This rigorous and demanding course is designed for serious students of literature who are planning to enter college. AP English engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through close reading of selected literary works, students deepen their understanding and enhance their pleasure in literature. To achieve these goals, students study individual works, their characters, action, structure, and language. Students are exposed to both large–scale literary elements, such as form and theme, and smaller scale elements, such as figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. A high level of verbal competence and skill in writing is required, as well as the ability of sustained independent inquiry. A high level of verbal competence and skill in writing is required, as well as the ability for sustained independent inquiry.
Credit: 1
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: English 11 or English 11 Honors
Final: Research Paper
*AP Exam is taken in May.

English 123: College Composition

College composition is an intensive study in the method, forms and style of composition, and in detailed analysis of the writing process. Students will acquire a foundation in the writing process by developing effective communication skills with an emphasis on expository writing, particularly the essay. Students will write a minimum of 24 evaluated pieces, including a documented piece of writing. They also will deliver an oral presentation.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 12
Prerequisites: English 11 or English 11 Honors and at least a 75 on the English Regents Exam
Final: Research Paper/Oral Presentation
College Credit: 3 CHS credits through SCCC

English 124: Introduction to Literature

This course introduces students to the interpretation of literature and the examination of literary genres, devices, and critical theory. Students read and discuss short fiction, drama, and poetry. Organizational pattern and composition techniques studied in English 123 are strengthened and refined by applying them to writing essays about assigned readings.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 12
Prerequisites: English 123: College Composition
Final: Research Paper/Exam/Oral Presentation
College Credit: 3 CHS credits through SCCC

Language and the Arts: Film as Literature

This course will examine classic and contemporary cinema as a modern literary form. Through an exploration of a variety of films, students will develop a better understanding of the art form and its place in the contemporary world. Students will be expected to complete occasional reading assignments in conjunction with the study of various films. Assessments will include a variety of writing assignments including critical and analytical essays, movie reviews, creative writing, personal response, screenplay excerpts, etc. Consistent attendance is critical for success in the course as most films will be viewed in class. Absences will require the completion of separate, substitute assignments. Class participation and active, alert viewing participation will amount to 20 percent of the final grade. Film lists will vary from semester to semester. Parental permission is required as some of the films will be rated R. Possible R–rated titles will include, but are not limited to, The Graduate (1967), Do the Right Thing (1989), and Crash (1984).
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: English 11 or English 11 Honors
Final: Exam

Media & Society

This course will look at how media and society are influenced by each other by looking at major media events of the last century through multiple communication models. Students will watch, read, and listen to rebroadcasts of events and analyze how coverage impacts the viewer/listener and how the viewer/listener impacts coverage. The course will also look at how technological advances have influenced coverage and storytelling while bringing the viewer/listener into the process.
Credit: .5
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: English 11 or English 11 Honors
Final: Project/Exam

Media Focus

This course guides students to become active viewers and producers of media. They learn to understand the language of film, to analyze commercials and political ads, and to interpret the visual messages and techniques used in TV news programs. After being given lessons and demonstrations with all necessary equipment, the students will produce their own assignment using individual ingenuity and creativity.
Credit: .5
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: English 11 or English 11 Honors
Final: 25 Page Script

Sports Journalism

This course is writing-intensive, focusing on modeling the style used specifically for sports articles and broadcasts, including use of blogs and tweets. Students will examine the various aspects of sports media, getting a behind the scenes look at such topics as interviewing athletes and coaches, how to choose and cover sporting events, and how to cover these by both speaking publicly and through digital media. Success in Sports Journalism is dependent on the completion of many articles, response journals, written and visual media projects, and research-based assignments.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: English 11 or English 11 Honors

Theater I

Primarily directed toward performance, this course is intended for the student who is interested in theater as a unique craft. The curriculum includes training in special skills related to theater performance and production. Students study the means of creating and producing drama as they engage in individual and group theatrical and theater–related tasks. The course covers stage language, voice and diction, stage movement, character, analysis, and the fundamentals of play production.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: English 11 or English 11 Honors

Final: Paper/Performance

Theater II

This course continues skill development for theater, but delves more deeply into aspects of play production, such as setting, lighting, costuming, and makeup. Students are encouraged to take Theater I, but it is not a prerequisite.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: English 11 or English 11 Honors
Final: Paper/Performance

Public Speaking

This course provides students an opportunity to develop an informed, proactive voice as citizens through the medium of speech. The class examines how speakers use language to affect audiences. Students explore and present speeches for a wide range of purposes and audiences. Oral presentations include speeches which entertain, inform, and persuade. Impromptu speeches and critical listening are required. The question addressed will be: How do individuals use oral language to affect audiences? Students are required to do peer and self-evaluations. Students who are intimidated by public speaking are encouraged to take this course to improve their confidence.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: English 11 or English 11 Honors
Final: Project/Speech

Introduction to Philosophy

A survey course in the history of western philosophy incorporating a cross-disciplinary English-Social Studies approach. It employs a chronological look at the lives, ideas and cultural-historical backgrounds of the major philosophers that have impacted western history and thought. Students explore the central questions that have preoccupied philosophers and laymen alike. Students are required to think critically and form their own conclusions and “personal philosophies,” which they will articulate and defend. Sophie’s World, a novel by Jostein Gaarder, is used as the basic text. In this work, an inquisitive high school girl receives an anonymous and mysterious “course” in philosophy, which profoundly effects her life. This text will be supplemented with handouts and relative selections and samples of other texts. Assessments are frequent DYRT quizzes, HW completion, journal writing, quizzes and some formal tests. While not an “easy” course, the grading is heavily based on completion of specific reading and HW assignments.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: English 11 or English 11 Honors
Final: Paper/Exam

Graduation Requirements

All students are required to pass four years of English to graduate. This can be accomplished through the following sequence:

  • Grade 9: English 9 or English 9 Honors
  • Grade 10: English 10 or English 10 Honors
  • Grade 11: English 11 or English 11 Honors
  • Grade 12: AP English or 2 English Electives

All students will take the English Regents Exam in June of their 11th grade year.

Summer Reading Assignments

All students entering grades 9–12, including those who take AP English are required to complete a summer reading assignment. Details about the reading assignment are generally sent home in June and are posted on this website.

Honors and Advanced Placement Courses

The honors and AP curriculum is designed for students who love to read and write. Courses are organized like Regents English classes but are aimed at greater proficiency of skills, a wider range of reading, and a greater depth of understanding. Extra summer reading and independent thinking and working are required. Strong reading and writing skills are necessary for success.

Entry into the program is through recommendation and application. Students need to reapply to the program each year, regardless of whether they were enrolled in Regents or honors courses the previous year.

Academic Intervention Services (AIS)

AIS courses are designed to help students reach the learning standards in English Language Arts. These intensive courses focus on the development of reading, writing, and communication skills. Students identified as needing AIS support for their English 11 class will be scheduled for a support lab instructed by a certified English teacher. Students who fail to meet the minimum of 65 on the ELA Regents will be scheduled for a Regents prep lab for support.

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Social Studies

The social studies program at Mohonasen is intended to prepare students to be productive citizens in the American democratic society of the 21st century. Students will be able to understand the interconnected world in which they live and be able to apply knowledge and skills learned to new and divergent problems and possibilities.

Course Offerings

Global History and Geography 9

In this course, students will study world history from Prehistoric times—through ancient and medieval civilizations—up to 1750. The course will stress themes like the impacts of geography, religion and growth and interactions of civilizations. This course fulfills 1 of the 2 global history and geography credits required for graduation in New York State.
Credit: 1
Grades: 9
Prerequisite: None
Final: Exam

World History 9 Honors

The purpose of this course is to offer an enriched study into Global History and Geography in preparation for AP World. Students enrolled in World History Honors are expected to enroll in AP World HIstory in grade 10. This course covers the history of humanity from its earliest origins through the French Revolution. Major areas of study include the interaction of human groups across time through trade, war, and climate shifts. Particular attention will be paid to the development of major world religions and gender roles that developed in various societies. This course fulfills 1 of the 2 global history and geography credits required for graduation in New York State.
Credit: 1
Grades: 9

AP World History

This course covers the history of humanity from its earliest origins to the modern day. Major areas of study include the interaction of human groups across time through trade, war, and climate shifts. Particular attention will be paid to the development of major world religions and gender roles that developed in various societies. This course fulfills the second of two global history and geography credits required for graduation in New York State.
Credit: 1
Grades: 10
Prerequisite: Global History and Geography 9
Final: Global History Regents Exam
*AP Exam is taken in May.

Global History 10

Global 10 continues the study of Global History and Geography, beginning with an examination of the Enlightenment and proceeding through the present day. Students will investigate enduring issues in world history that have shaped modern society. Students will examine issues, themes, and historical events from multiple perspectives and make global connections that lead to in-depth understanding. This course fulfills the second of two global history and geography credits required for graduation in New York State.
Credit: 1
Grades: 10
Prerequisite: Global History and Geography 9
Final: Global History Regents Exam

United States History & Government

This course examines the history of the United States from pre-colonial times to the present. The U.S. Constitution is a key unit of study and provides the framework for subsequent time periods. Students will develop and exercise their critical thinking skills through the analysis of primary and secondary sources, and both thematic and document-based writing.

Credit: 1
Grades: 11
Prerequisite: Global History 10 or AP World History
Final: Regents Exam

AP US History

This course is designed for students who have a solid record of academic achievement and an interest in history. In addition to the content of US History, this course offers students the opportunity to debate controversial issues and analyze primary source documents.
Credit: 1
Grades: 11
Prerequisite: Global History 10 or AP World History
Final: US History & Government Regents Exam
*AP Exam is taken in May.

Participation in Government (PIG)

This course is designed to promote such skills as civic intelligence, civic mindedness, civic literacy, and civic enterprise. Government is taken in the broadest sense to include all citizen groups interested in the issues of society and politics. The course utilizes community resources, both in the classroom and in the community, in such a way as to link the classroom experience to the wider society.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: US History and Government or AP US History
Final: Exam

Participation in Government – Honors

This course is a thorough examination of the practices and functions of the United States government. Upon completion of this course students will have discussed and debated the branches of government, the role of political parties, the media’s role in politics, fair elections and the size of government. In addition how Americans interacted and used the political process to broaden civil liberties, expand public policy and bring about a better country and society. The course will be predominantly project based and will have a community action component in addition to the regular curriculum. Through projects and community service, students will gain a broader understanding of the workings of United States government, the current state of democracy in the U.S., and experience first-hand methods of participating in government and their community.
Credit: 0.5
Grade: 12
Pre-req: Honors Application

Economics

Students in this course will study the economic system of the United States and its operation. They will examine the economic interdependence of the world today and their roles as workers, investors and voting citizens. Students will demonstrate a basic understanding of economic principles that will allow them to make informed decisions about our democracy and economy. Students must pass economics in order to graduate.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: US History and Government or AP US History
Final: Exam

Economics – Honors

This course provides an overview of microeconomic and macroeconomic issues and an understanding of the economic choices that individuals, firms, and governments face. It also introduces the concept of scarcity and the working process of a market economic system. Further, this course examines the different market structures, the role of the firm and the impact of government intervention on markets and individuals through fiscal and monetary policy. Also, this course examines current issues and trends such as average households financial state, inflation, unemployment, economic growth, international trade, health care, and renewable energy. Finally, there is a strong emphasis on personal finance through examining the concepts of credit, budgeting, career planning and both short and long- term investment options.
Credit: 0.5
Grade: 12
Pre-req: Honors Application

Graduation Requirements

All students are required to take four years of social studies to graduate. This is accomplished through the following sequence:

  • Grade 9: Global History 9 or Global History 9H
  • Grade 10: Global History 10A or AP World History
  • Grade 11: US History and Government or AP US History
  • Grade 12: Participation in Government (PIG) and Economics

Academic Intervention Services (AIS)

AIS services are provided through AIS Regents Prep Labs in Global and/or US History for students who do not initially pass those required exams.

Advanced Placement Courses (AP)

AP courses in social studies are geared for serious history students with an interest in reading and writing. These courses entail significant research and written work. Selection into courses is based on a combination of grades (final averages, mid-term exams, final exams, and Regents Exams), teacher recommendation (current year social studies teacher), and student interest (attendance at interest meetings, and timely submission of application).

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Math

The math program at Mohonasen offers preparation in the concepts and skills necessary for competence in mathematics, as well as preparation for further study. Students will learn problem-solving techniques, gain a deeper knowledge of our number system, acquire experience with quantitative reasoning, and develop critical-thinking skills.

Course Offerings

Common Core Regents Algebra I

This course is an introduction to algebraic concepts that emphasize the New York State Common Core learning standards. The topics covered provide a foundational understanding in algebra that prepares students for further study in mathematics. Topics covered throughout the course include foundational algebraic skills, linear inequalities, linear, quadratic and exponential functions, systems of equations, sequences and series, and statistics. This course prepares students to take the Algebra I Regents exam in June.

Credit: 1
Grades: 9
Prerequisite: successful completion of Math 8.
Final: Common Core Algebra Regents Exam.

Common Core Regents Geometry

This course will reinforce topics covered in Algebra and introduce logic, right–triangle geometry, area and volume of geometric shapes, transformations and properties of quadrilaterals and triangles. This course enables students to take the Common Core Geometry Regents Exam in June.

Credit: 1
Grades: 9, 10, 11

Prerequisite: CC Regents Algebra I  (75 or better) or Common Core Geometry and a score of 65 or better on the Common Core Algebra I Regents Exam.
Final: Common Core Geometry Regents Exam

Common Core Regents Geometry w/ Lab

This course will cover the same material as CC Regents Geometry but will give students an additional 40 min support lab.  It will reinforce topics covered in Algebra and introduce logic, right–triangle geometry, area and volume of geometric shapes, transformations and properties of quadrilaterals and triangles. This course enables students to take the Common Core Geometry Regents Exam in June.

Credit: 1
Grades: 9, 10, 11

Prerequisite: CC Regents Algebra I (65 or better), Regents Algebra AIS II (with teacher recommendation) or Common Core Geometry and a score of 65 or better on the Common Core Algebra I Regents Exam.
Final: Common Core Geometry Regents Exam

Common Core Geometry

This course covers primarily Euclidean geometry, congruence, similarity, and transformation including rigid motions. It also includes the study of triangles with emphasis on real-world and theoretical situations including triangle congruence. Points, lines, planes, circles and other figures in 2-dimensional space are studied along with the primary 3-dimensional figures.

Credit: 1
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Regents Algebra I AIS Part II.
Final: Local Final Exam

Common Core Regents Algebra II

This course is designed for the strong Regents Geometry student who will gain a greater depth of understanding mathematical concepts and how they relate to the world using real-life applications. The scope and content include polynomial and rational expressions, real and complex numbers, relations and functions, transformational geometry, exponential and logarithmic functions, circles, trigonometric graphs, equations and identities, and probability and statistics.

Credit: 1
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Algebra II Part I with at least an 80 average, or CC Regents Geometry average of 85 or higher
Final: Algebra 2 Regents Exam or Common Core Algebra 2 Regents Exam

Common Core Regents Algebra II w/ Lab

This course covers the same material as Regents Algebra II with an additional 40 min lab time provided every other day.  The course is designed for the student who needs additional support and instruction to be successful on the Algebra 2 Regents Exam.

Credit: 1
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II Part I or  CC Regents Geometry (average 75 or better).
Final: Common Core Algebra 2 Regents Exam

Common Core Algebra II (Part 1)

This course is intended for students who have successfully completed both an algebra and a geometry course. Topics covered will include functions, rational expressions, radicals, exponents, logarithms, and trigonometry. While this course does not cover all the concepts required for the Common Core Algebra II regents exam, it provides students a foundation in many of the mathematical concepts preparing them for the Common Core Algebra II course (which culminates in the Algebra 2 Regents exam) the following year. A local final exam will be given in June.

Credit: 1
Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Common Core Geometry with at least a 65 average, or successful completion of CC Regents Geometry.
Final: Local Exam

Intermediate Algebra

This course is designed to fulfill the third year graduation requirement for math. The scope and content include polynomial and rational expressions, equations, and inequalities, real and complex numbers and algebraic and mathematical concepts.

Credit: 1
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: Geometry
Final: Local Final

Statistics

This college-level course is intended for students looking for a fourth credit in mathematics. Statistics is one of the most widely used applications of mathematics and this course is intended to teach students how to use statistics to interpret the world around them. Students will learn about collecting data and sampling techniques, organizing data for presenting information, and analyzing data to make good decisions. A local final exam will be given in June. This course is offered with College in the High School credits. Students may opt to challenge the AP exam with an additional course of study

Credit: 1
Grades: 11,12
Prerequisite: 2 years of high school math and completion of
College Credit: 3 CHS credits through SCCC
Final: Local Final exam

Pre-Calculus

This course is designed to prepare students for college-level mathematics. It includes a very thorough study of all algebraic and trigonometric functions, polynomial equations, functional notations, sequence and series, conic matrices, rectors and rational functions. This course is highly recommended for those planning to attend college.

Credit: 1
Grades: 11 12

Prerequisite: CC Algebra II  w/ or w/o Lab with at least an 85 average and a score of 65 or higher on the Algebra 2 Regents Exam.
Final: Local Final Exam
College Credit: 4 CHS credits through SCCC

Advanced Placement Calculus (AB)

This course will cover topics such as functions, graphs, limits, derivatives, and integrals and their applications. It is the final course in the accelerated math sequence.

Credit: 1
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus (80+average recommended)
Final: Local Final Exam
College Credit: CHS credits through SCCC
*AP exam is offered in May, college credit possible based on test results

Computer Science

This course is designed as an introduction to a range of topics in computer science. Through a series of engaging, hands-on projects, students will begin their study of web design and computer programming. The application and limits of computing will be explored through current topics in computing that are also relevant to high school students. An emphasis will be placed on developing problem-solving and computational thinking skills. (Note: This class is also listed under Emerging Technologies.)

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Successful completion of CC regents Geometry
Final: Exam
College Credit: 3 credits (Through Siena College)

Introduction to Software Development

This course is designed to continue a student’s introduction to the academic discipline of Computer Science.  Course objectives include developing a student’s ability to create programming solutions, to translate algorithmic solutions to a Java implementation, to acquire knowledge about computing systems in general, and to enhance a student’s problem-solving abilities.  

Credit: 1.0
Grade: 12
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Computer Science; or successful completion of Common Core Algebra II with teacher recommendation or Precalculus.

College Credit: 4 credits (Through Siena College)

Graduation Requirements

All students are required to earn at least three units of high school math to graduate. However, students are highly encouraged to continue with math throughout high school. Students also must pass at least one math Regents in order to graduate. The Common Core Algebra Regents Exam is given in June of the year students have completed Regents Algebra. In order to earn an Advanced Regents Diploma, students are required to pass the Common Core Algebra, Common Core Geometry, and Algebra II Regents Exams.

The sequence of courses is determined by a student’s previous academic record in math and, at times, by teacher recommendation. If students would like to challenge their placement a meeting with their guidance counselor, the math administrator, and a parent is required. Download Math Options Flow Chart

A student can earn a math and/or science distinction on their diploma if she/he scores at least an 85 on three Regents exams in that area (math or science or both).

Academic Intervention Services (AIS)

AIS is delivered to students through an attached math lab. Students receiving AIS services in math will have 80 minute classes every other day with an additional 40 minute lab every other day. Students will complete the necessary coursework within one year and will take the Common Core Algebra I Regents exam. Other supports include Regents Prep labs for students who are not successful on the Common Core Algebra I Regents exam.

Calculators

The Texas Instruments 83 or 84 graphing calculators are an important part of the math curriculum. These calculators are used at all levels of the curriculum. A limited number of calculators are available within the class, however, students are strongly encouraged to purchase their own. They are available at competitive prices at most department and office supply stores. These calculators are recommended for all math classes and required for the Integrated Algebra, Geometry, and Algebra II Regents Exams.

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Science

The department puts science in historical perspective and relates it to problems in society and technology. Science is concerned with the facts, concepts, and processes at work in the physical and biological worlds. Emphasis is placed on problem–solving skills and scientific attitudes.

Course Offerings

Living Environment: Life Science

This course is designed to provide an understanding of life science and the interdependence of living things.  It is taught in accordance with the New York State core curriculum.

Credit 1.0
Grades 9,10
Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Science 8
Final: Living Environment Regents Exam

Earth Science: Physical Setting

This course will explore the science of geology, astronomy, and meteorology.  It introduces students to a wide range of fundamental principle, ideas, and investigation techniques.

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 9,10,11
Prerequisite: Preferred to have passed Living Environment.
Final: Earth Science Regents Exam

Earth Science Honors: Physical Setting

This lab intensive course uses an inquiry based approach to develop the intuitive understanding of the Earth’s processes, events and functions.  Students will design their own experiments and conduct year long research projects.  Ethical evaluation of human impact on Earth’s resources is incorporated to a higher extent in this course.

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 9,10,11
Prerequisite: Preferred to have passed Living Environment and passes or be currently enrolled in CC Regents Geometry
Final: Earth Science Regents Exam

Principles of Chemistry: Physical Setting

In this course students will explore the nature of matter, energy; the mole, formulas and equations, states of matter , composition of atoms, chemical bonding, rates of reaction , acid and bases and several other chemistry concepts.

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Two years of science and enrollment in, or completion of CC Algebra 2 Part 1, CC Regents Algebra 2 or Intermediate Algebra
Final: Chemistry Regents Exam

Principles of Physics: Physical Setting

This course is the study of the physical world from the subatomic to the cosmic level.  Is it designed for students with a strong science and math background, especially for those students planning to study science or engineering in the future.  Students will study the nature of matter and energy and how they are related. Topics include mechanics, waves and light, electricity and magnetism, and atomic and modern physics.

Credit:1
Grades:11, 12
Prerequisite:At least three (3) Regents Science credits and enrollment in, or completion of, CC Regents, Algebra 2

Core Physical Science: Physical Setting

In this introductory, non-regents physical science course students will explore the chemistry and physics perspectives of topics such as energy, forces, nuclear science, and states of matter.  Students will experience hands-on, inquiry, and exploratory learning activities as they gain a better understanding of the physical world around them.

Credit:1
Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: At least two (2) science credits and at least one (1) Science Regents Exam.
Final:  Local Final Exam

AP Physics 1

AP Physics 1 is a full-year honors level physics course that is the equivalent of a first-semester introductory college course in algebra-based physics. Students will deepen their understanding of physics through inquiry-based investigations as they explore the topics of kinematics; dynamics; circular motion; gravitation; energy; momentum; simple harmonic motion; torque and rotational motion; electrostatics; direct current circuits; and mechanical waves and sound. Students will take the AP Physics 1 exam in May and then prepare to take the NYS Physical Setting: Physics Regents Examination in June.  Between the AP Exam and the Regents Exam, students will explore the topics of magnetism, electromagnetic waves, and particle physics.

Credit: 1
Grade: 11, 12
Prerequisite: At least three (3) Regents Science credits and enrollment in, or completion of, CC Regents Algebra 2 (without lab)
Final: Physical Setting: Physics Regents Exam. To be eligible to sit for the exam, students must have 1200 hands on minutes of laboratory experience with satisfactory reports on file.
AP exam is offered in May, college credit possible on test results

Introduction to Medical Science: Life Science

This course of study will help prepare students interested in entering a two or four year college program in an health or medical related related profession.  Weather interested in being a pharmacist, nurse, doctor, paramedic or technician etc. this course will expose students to the many branches of medicine.  Students will be instructed in standard diagnostic technostic techniques, treatment procedures, medical terminology, medical reporting, and biomedical ethics.  Topics include, but are not limited to: basic anatomy and physiology, microbiology and epidemiology, oncology, dermatology, orthopedics, hematology, cardiology, respiratory therapy, radiology, neurology, and psychology.  In addition, students will gain hands-on practical experiences to help develop skills in basic first aid CPR.  This course can be used to meet the third year science course requirement.

Credit: 1
Grades: 10,11,12
Prerequisite: two years of High School science courses – One in Life and one in Physical science – (one of those a  Regents level class ).
Final: Exam

Advanced Placement Biology: Life Science

This course is the equivalent of a first year, two semester college biology course.  It is based on the College Board AP Biology framework.  Topics include evolution and diversity of life, biological systems and maintenance of homeostasis, life processes, and the interactions of biological systems.  The course will culminate in the AP Biology exam in May.

Credit: 1
Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: Three  years of regents level science with a minimum of 85 average and successful completion or currently enrolled in Chemistry.
Final: exam
AP exam is offered in May, college credit possible on test results

Environmental Studies

Relevant environmental issues and their resulting impacts, as well as sustainable energy and agriculture, will be investigated through interdisciplinary research, literature and field based inquiry.  This course includes fall/spring garden labor and production, and on campus multipurpose landscape design, installation and maintenance. Additionally this course incorporates lectures, guest speakers, off campus learning labs and student projects.

Credit: 1
Grades: 11,12
Prerequisite two years of science
Final: Exam
3 CHS credits through SCCC

AP Chemistry

The AP Chemistry course provides students with a college-level foundation to support future advanced coursework in chemistry. Students cultivate their understanding of chemistry through inquiry-based investigations, as they explore content such as: atomic structure, intermolecular forces and bonding, chemical reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics, and equilibrium.

College Course Equivalent The AP Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year.

Lab Requirement This course requires that 25 percent of instructional time engages students in lab investigations. This includes a minimum of 16 hands-on labs (at least six of which are inquiry-based). It is recommended that students keep a lab notebook throughout.

Credit: 1
Grade: 11, 12
Prerequisite: At least three (3) Regents Science credits (including successful completion of Principles of Chemistry) and enrollment in, or completion of, CC Regents Algebra 2.
Final: Local Final Exam
**Students enrolled in AP Chemistry are expected to take the AP exam which is offered in May.

Criminal Justice

Criminal Science

This course is a survey of a crime laboratory. It looks at the role of the lab in criminal investigations including firearms identification, examination of documents, crime scene analysis, and fingerprinting.

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 11,12
Prerequisite: Application
Other: Must be taken with Introduction to Criminal Justice
*Registration priority given to juniors

Graduation Requirements

All students are required to pass three years of science to graduate. One of these courses must be in a life science (Living Environment or Living Environment I and II) and at least one course must be in a physical setting (Earth Science, Chemistry, Physics, Environmental Studies, Core Physical Setting, Alternative Energy Systems/Intro. to Nanotechnology).

All students also need to take and pass at least one Regents Exam in science. Two Regents Exams are required for an Advanced Regents Diploma.

A student can earn a math and/or science distinction on their diploma if she/he scores at least an 85 on three Regents exams in that area (math or science or both).

Laboratory Requirements

Completion of required laboratory experiments and activities, including submission of acceptable written reports of all experiments and activities, is mandated for admission to New York State Regents Exams in science. As per NYS Education Department regulations, students must complete at least 1200 lab minutes in any course that leads to a science Regents exam. They also are required for district local final examinations, as per department policy. Labs meet for an additional 40 minutes two days during the six–day cycle.

Prerequisites

Prerequisites as listed for science courses are to be interpreted as the minimum background for success in a given course. Any deviation must be within the recommendation of the student’s counselor, the academic administrator for science, and the principal. Math courses are part of the prerequisite because of the necessary problem–solving skills they teach.

Honors and Advanced Placement Courses (AP)

The placement of students into honors and AP courses is done through a merit-based evaluation system and applications are required. Averages, teacher recommendations, summer projects, and parent approval are all be part of the process. It is the goal of the science department to offer these courses to the most motivated and deserving students. Students are expected to take the AP Exam for each AP course they are enrolled in.

Academic Intervention Services (AIS)

AIS in science is offered through the sequence of Living Environment I, Living Environment II, and Core Setting to support those students who have not yet passed the Living Environment Regents. The curriculum of these courses has been designed to supplement English Language Arts and math skills.

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World Language

The goal of the world language department is to provide increasing competence in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural understanding. Concurrent with the development of language skills, instruction will aim to provide cultural insight and understanding of other people, their land and geography, their history, and their thoughts and actions.

Course Offerings

French 1

This course is an introduction to French language and culture, and allows students to establish a basic foundation in the communicative skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will be able to communicate in these areas within a fixed vocabulary range.
Credit: 1
Grades: 9,10,11,12
Prerequisite: None
Final: Exam

French 2

In this course communicative skills are strengthened by increasing depth of vocabulary and structure, and by reinforcement and expansion of previously learned language concepts. Culture remains an integral part of the program. Students will grow in their ability to communicate from a basic to an intermediate level.
Credit: 1 
Grades: 9,10,11,12
Prerequisite: French 1 
Final: Exam

French 3

Students continue to expand their communicative abilities and their understanding of the French speaking world. Students increase their vocabulary and their knowledge of structure and develop strategies for mastering a larger and more sophisticated variety of materials and language tasks.
Credit: 1
Grades: 10,11,12
Prerequisite: French 2
Final: Local Exam

College Credit: 3 CHS credits through SCCC

French 4

In this course students move toward self–expression in French and showcase their creativity in a variety of projects. These include a reflection on Francophone poetry, short stories, and a short novel. Students accumulate experience with more advanced structure concepts and nuances of the language.
Credit: 1
Grades: 11,12
Prerequisite: French 3
Final: Checkpoint B Exam
College Credit: 3 CHS credits through SCCC

French 5

Students continue their growth toward an advanced-level of expertise in French by expansion of their communicative skills, understanding of culture, and more exposure to literature and history. Projects continue to reflect students’ creativity and increasing sophistication in the language. As in previous levels, there is emphasis on the usefulness of French in business and other employment areas.
Credit: 1
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: French 4
Final: Exam
College Credit: 3 CHS credits through SCCC

Spanish 1

This course introduces students to the Spanish language and culture of the Hispanic people. Communicative skills of listening and speaking are
developed. At the end of the course, students will posses sufficient basic vocabulary and structure to comprehend and express themselves with others.
Credit: 1
Grades: 9,10,11,12
Prerequisite: None
Final: Exam

Spanish 2

The fundamental language skills possessed by the student at the end of Spanish 1 will be reinforced. While oral communication remains the primary objective, reading and writing skills will be expanded through increased vocabulary and greater emphasis on grammatical structures.
Credit: 1
Grades: 9,10,11,12
Prerequisite: Spanish 1
Final: Exam

Spanish 3

This course, a synthesis of Spanish 1 and 2, offers a formal analysis of grammar for use in reading and writing. Writing is emphasized through guided and original compositions. Vocabulary is expanded through supplemental readings. And conversational and listening skills are further developed through dialogue.
Credit: 1
Grades: 10,11,12
Prerequisite: Spanish 2
Final: Local Exam

College Credit: 3 CHS credits through SCCC

Spanish 4

Grammar from Spanish 1,2 and 3 is reinforced and expanded upon through readings in the native language.
Credit: 1
Grades: 11,12
Prerequisite: Spanish 3
Final: Checkpoint B Exam
College Credit: 3 CHS credits through SCCC

Spanish 5

The objective of the course is to provide students with an in–depth study of the Spanish language. The goal is for students to demonstrate what they can produce in Spanish using a variety of formats. Some of the work completed during the year will reflect the student’s particular areas of interest and independent research. The course will involve thematic units allowing students to improve communicative proficiency, literary criticism and interpretation, translation, and cross-cultural understanding.
Credit: 1
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: Spanish 4 and a 65 on the Spanish Checkpoint B Exam
Final: Exam
College Credit: 3 UHS credits through SCCC are available.

Sequences and Requirements

One credit of foreign language is required to graduate in New York State. This requirement can be met in several ways:

  • Earn at least a 65 in French 1 A/B or Spanish 1 A/B and a 65 on the French/Spanish exam in eighth grade.

  • Earn a 65 in French 1/Spanish 1 in high school.

To earn a sequence in foreign language, students must pass French 3/Spanish 3 and pass the corresponding final exam. Doing this will meet the sequence requirement for an Advanced Regents Diploma.

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Health & Physical Education

The goal of health and physical education courses is to encourage students to be physically active and expand their understanding of personal habits and their importance in promoting short- and long-term physical health. In addition to class instruction, an extensive intramural program is offered to students.

Physical Education Grading

All students will be graded using a rubric in physical education class. Each day is worth 5 points. Students are graded on participation/dress, effort, punctuality, and attitude. If all of these expectations are met for that day, 5 points will be awarded. It is possible to receive anywhere from 0-5 points per day. Students must dress appropriately for PE and participate actively and to the best of their ability for the entire class in order to receive full credit.

Students who are absent from school will lose 5 points for that day. Students who are absent from PE class for both excused (attending a school field trip, scheduled music lessons, scheduled guidance or other counselor meeting, state and local exams) and unexcused (class cut) reasons will also lose credit (5 points) for that day. If a student does not change or participate in class, they will also lose 5 points for that day. Students will be allowed to make-up and receive full credit for all excused absences and “0’s.” Class cuts are cannot be made up for class credit. PE make-ups may be done in two ways:

  • Intramurals: Attending intramurals Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday when offered during 10th period. The schedule is posted every Monday and will change weekly.
  • PE Class with your teacher: Students must get an ORANGE pre-signed pass from their actual PE teacher to attend class with their teacher during lunch or study hall for make-up credit.

Course Offerings

Physical Education 9-12

Credit: 0.25/semester
Grades: 9,10,11,12
Final: None

Currently, students in PE classes have the option to choose which type of activities they would like to participate in.  We separate these activities into groups, and offer 3 different options each period.

Team Sports

Team Sports consists of highly competitive team sports, like football, soccer and basketball.  They utilize the sport education model, where every student has their own role/responsibility (coach, captain, fitness instructor, scorekeeper, official, etc.).  At the beginning of each unit, they draft new teams, come up with team names and designate who will perform each role.  Next, they spend a few classes developing skills and strategies for gameplay as a team.  The remainder of the unit consists of tournament play that leads to a championship game to designate the winning team of that particular sport unit.

Individual Sports and Fitness

The Individual Sports and Fitness group is less competitive for the most part.  It includes individual sports such as badminton, tennis and modified volleyball.  It also focuses on improving fitness levels while participating in various fitness-related activities such as yoga, pilates, dance, etc.

Strength and Conditioning

The Strength and Conditioning group will take place in the weight room and focus on improving muscular strength and endurance, agility, speed and power.  These students will learn various weight lifting and strength training techniques.  They will also focus on sport-specific exercises necessary to improve performance on the athletic field/court.

Health

Health education is the process of providing learning experiences for the purpose of influencing knowledge, attitudes, and conduct relating to individual, community, and world health. The course also helps instruct students how to maintain or improve their health and be able to secure abundant vigor and vitality that are the foundations for the greatest possible happiness and service in personal, family, and community life.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 10,11,12
Prerequisite: None
Final: Test/Project

Graduation Requirements

All students are required to earn two units in physical education over the course of four years. This entails students taking PE every other day throughout high school. Students who fail PE will be rescheduled for two PE courses the following semester.

Students unable to take PE will be given written assignments to earn credits. In such cases, a written statement from a doctor must be given to the school nurse in a timely fashion.

All students are also required to complete and pass a health course. Mohonasen has added the state-mandated parenting course to the health curriculum.

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Career and Technical Education (CTE) and the Arts

Art

The curriculum of the art department is available for all students. These courses are designed to enable students to learn more about themselves and their abilities so they can succeed in school and in life. These classes will help prepare the serious art student as well as enhance the skills of all students.

Course Offerings

Studio in Art

Studio in Art is required as a student’s first experience. The student will work in two or three dimensions in a great variety of media, which may include drawing, watercolor, tempera, printmaking, sculpture, pottery, charcoals, pastels, pen and ink, or lettering. Processes, techniques, and fundamentals of design are learned largely through students’ involvement in substantial and exciting projects. Art appreciation, art criticism, aesthetics, and art history are integrated into the program and correlated within the art projects.
Credit: 1
Grades: 9,10,11,12
Lab Fee: $10
Final: Exam/Project
Prerequisite: None
*Course is a prerequisite for all other art courses.
*Meets art/music requirement for graduation.

Drawing and Painting

This course enables students to study figure, still life, and landscape drawing and painting. This course prepares students for teaching, illustrating, designing, and other art-related careers.
Credit: 1
Grades: 10,11,12
Lab Fee: $10
Final: Project/Self-Assessment
Prerequisite: Studio in Art

Ceramics 1

This will be an introduction to ceramics. Students will begin to explore the processes, techniques, equipment and tools used when working with clay. They will be taught the basic skills of hand building such as pinching, coiling and slab construction, as well as an introduction to throwing on the wheel. Students will also learn the basic techniques for glazing and other surface treatments used in the ceramic arts.
Credit: .5
Grades: 10,11,12
Lab Fee: $10
Final: Exam
Prerequisite: Studio in Art

Sculpture 1

This course will be an introduction to sculpture. Projects will be created on a small scale using a variety of media. We will look at different styles of sculpture throughout art history. Students will explore the three-dimensional relationship of volume, mass, form and light.
Credit: .5 Grades: 10,11,12
Lab Fee: $10
Final: Exam
Prerequisite: Studio in Art

Graphic Arts

In this course, students will be introduced to the elements and principles of basic graphic design. Students will learn about the design world we live in from creation to production and the steps between. Students will create a variety of projects including logos, posters, mailers, ads and brochures. Through the study of typography, design problem-solving, and design concepts, students will discover how to creatively and competently design using technology used in the field today. Students will work with Adobe In-Design, Illustrator, and Photoshop on Mac computers to create basic design projects as well as many professional work samples. A thumb drive is required.
Credit: 1.0
Grades: 11,12
Prerequisite: Studio Art, and Drawing and Painting OR Sculpture/Ceramics
Lab Fee: $10 (Ink and Paper)

Advanced Studio 3D: Ceramics II

This course will expand on the knowledge and experience gained in Ceramics I. Students will learn more advanced techniques in hand building, throwing on the potter’s wheel, and glazing. They will learn to use a combination of different techniques of building to create their pieces. Students in this class will also take a more active role in the daily job of keeping a ceramics studio running. Many projects will allow the self-motivated and independent art student to develop their own artistic voice when creating solutions to creative problem solving assignments.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 11,12
Lab Fee: $10
Final: Project
Prerequisite: Studio in Art, Ceramics 1

Advanced Studio 3D : Sculpture II

This course will expand on the knowledge and experience gained in Sculpture I. A variety of media and technique choices will be available to the students as they explore the application of more complex design problems in both relief and sculpture in the round. Many projects will allow the self-motivated and independent art student to develop their own artistic voice when creating solutions to creative problem solving assignments.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 11,12
Lab Fee: $10
Final: Project
Prerequisite: Studio in Art, Sculpture 1

Advanced Studio: Drawing and Painting

This course is designed for the student who needs an art portfolio for college. The course covers composition, elements and principles of design, and color theory. Personal expression and drawing from observation will be stressed.
Credit: 1
Grades: 11,12
Lab Fee: $10
Final: Exhibit/Portfolio
Prerequisite: Studio in Art, Drawing and Painting
*College Credit: 3 CHS credits through SCCC

Digital Photography

In this course, students will learn the basic principles of photography including exposure, framing, perspective, and proportion. Students will complete units based on landscape, portraiture, still life, and abstract photography. Adobe Photoshop and InDesign will be the prominent programs used in this course. A digital camera is required for this course.
Credit: .5
Grades: 11,12
Lab fee: $10
Final: Project
Prerequisite: Studio Art, and Drawing and Painting OR Sculpture/Ceramics

Independent Study Art

This course is designed for the student who is interested in pursuing their artwork in a deeper, more advanced or sophisticated level of study. Focus will be made by the individual and their specific direction. Students must be independent and self–motivated to be successful in this course.
Credit: .5 or 1
Grades: 12
Lab fee: $10
Final: Project
Prerequisite: Studio in Art, Drawing and Painting and Advanced Studio 3D: Sculpture or Ceramics or Advanced Studio: Drawing and Painting
* Need to complete application and receive permission from instructor.

Sequences and Requirements

In order to receive a five-unit sequence in art toward an Advanced Regents Diploma, students must first complete and pass Studio Art. Students may receive the other four credits through other art courses.

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Business Career Technical Education

The business department’s goals are to provide students with the knowledge and the skills necessary for college; to prepare students to directly enter the world of work; to give students information that is helpful in carrying on personal business affairs and entrepreneurship; and to prepare students to make informed economic decisions in life.

By completing Mohonasen’s Business Administration CTE Pathway, students can receive a CTE designation on their diploma AND learn valuable college and career skills. In some cases, a CTE pathway can also be used to meet a graduation requirement.

Accounting CTE Pathway

By completing Mohonasen’s Accounting CTE Pathway, students can receive a CTE designation on their diploma AND learn valuable college and career skills. In some cases, a CTE pathway can also be used to meet graduation requirements.

Career and Financial Management I

This course is designed to help students make a smooth transition from the classroom to a meaningful career. It helps students understand the economic system and their role as a productive worker and citizen of the United States. Students learn about business organizational structure and entrepreneurship. Topics include business economics, consumerism, financial management, business management and leadership. Students will be introduced to careers in business law, marketing, accounting and business management.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 9,10
Programs: Internet
Final: Exam
Prerequisites: None
* Required for all business, family and consumer science, and technology sequences.

Accounting I

Accounting is designed to give the student complete understanding of the accounting cycle, from opening entries through Post-Closing Trial Balance for a service business organized as a sole proprietorship. Accounting basics, journalizing and posting, cash controls, worksheet, financial statements, adjusting and closing entries will be taught. Additionally, the course will focus on the auditing procedures, interpreting financial information, as well as the importance of strong business ethics. The goal of the course is to give students’ strong foundation skills that will assist them whether they pursue a career in an accounting or related business field and is vital for any student thinking of becoming an entrepreneur.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None
Final: Exam

Accounting II

Accounting II builds on the Accounting I concepts with more in-depth study of the accounting cycle using more complex businesses that are merchandising businesses that are organized as a corporation. Special journals, payroll processes and taxes, uncollectible accounts, capital stock, declaration of dividends and depreciation of plants assets are just a few of the topics that will be covered. Additionally, the course focuses on the importance of auditing procedures, vertical and horizontal analysis of financial statements, as well as the importance of strong business ethics. The goal of the course is to give students’ accounting skills that will assist them as they pursue a career in a business field or continued study for a career as an Accountant.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None
Final: Exam

Business Law I

Students will develop understanding of the origins of our legal system and contemporary legal processes that are essential for business and personal success. Legal cases will be discussed and solved through the use of critical-thinking skills and application of laws. Students gain valuable insight regarding their personal rights as well as their liability toward others. Contract negotiations are an integral part of commerce and everyday life. Students will understand the framework of contract law in order to conduct themselves as responsible adults.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 11,12
Prerequisite: None
Final: Exam
*College Credit: 3 CHS credits through SCCC may be available for students who successfully complete Business Law I & II
*Offered every other year

Business Law II

Business Law II continues the learning of Business Law I with an in depth study of contract law and explores the nuances of creation, assent, satisfaction and remedies in the event of breach of contract. Additionally, students explore the contractual obligations of marriage and legal ramifications of divorce, ownership of property, wills and estates. They will examine the types of intellectual property and investigate the evolving cyber laws in relation to their personal and business needs.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 11,12
Prerequisite: Business Law I
Final: Exam
*College Credit: 3 CHS credits through SCCC may be available for students who successfully complete Business Law I & II
*Offered every other year

Principles of Marketing I

Marketing I is designed to provide students with an introduction to marketing. This course focuses on key marketing concepts, the role of marketing within organizations, and the role of marketing in society. Marketing I allows students to build foundational marketing skills, which further can be explored in Marketing II. Topics covered in this course include: designing marketing strategies, consumer behavior, social media and e-marketing, market research, types of markets, and relationship and customer relationship marketing.
Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: None
*College Credit: 3 CHS credits through SCCC may be available for students who successfully complete Marketing I & II
*Offered every other year

Principles of Marketing II

Marketing II provides an introduction to the marketing mix functions and process. It includes the identification of consumer and organizational needs, analysis of how sales promotion and advertising programs are developed, and the role of market segmentation in developing a marketing strategy. Topics covered in this course include: product and service strategies, developing and managing a product, marketing channels, pricing concepts, and promotional decisions.
Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Marketing I
*College Credit: 3 CHS credits through SCCC may be available for students who successfully complete Marketing I & II
*Offered every other year

Career Portfolio: Career and Financial Management II

This course is designed to develop competencies essential for successful employment. Students will be required to compile a portfolio containing a resume, cover letter, interview skills, and career research project. Additionally, students will prepare for the college experience by preparing activity sheets and college essays, as well as researching college course of studies in the career fields they are interested in pursuing. Successfully reaching college and career goals are major student objectives in this class.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 11,12
Programs: Internet
Final: Exam/Portfolio
Prerequisite: None
* Required for all business sequences.

Supplemental Courses

Business Computer Applications

This course exposes students to Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Access. This course is highly recommended for all students pursuing business studies at the post-secondary level. Students will complete projects that integrate the software programs listed and will be exposed to real-life business activities. These include creating newsletters, brochures, expense reports, sales reports, inventory reports, marketing reports and business proposals.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 9,10,11,12
Final: Exam

Financial Literacy

It is essential in our fast moving society to have a working knowledge of the fundamentals of financial planning and money management. Units covered will include: your financial plan, budgeting, investing, debt, using credit wisely, keeping your money safe and secure, and insurance. The focus of the course is to provide students the opportunity to be successful in understanding and managing their personal finances now and plan for their financial future.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 11,12
Prerequisites: None
Final: Exam

Sports and Entertainment Marketing

This course will help students develop a thorough understanding of the marketing concepts and theories that apply to sports and sporting events. The areas this course will cover include basic marketing, target marketing and segmentation, sponsorship, event marketing, promotions, sponsorship proposals, branding and licensing, and implementation of sports marketing plans. This course will also delve into promotional plans, sponsorship proposals, sports marketing plans, and event evaluation and management techniques. Students taking Sports and Entertainment Marketing will investigate related college and career opportunities in the sports and entertainment fields.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 10,11,12
Prerequisites: None
Final: Exam
Programs: Microsoft PowerPoint
*Offered every other year

Business Ownership and Marketing

Students will undertake the process of establishing a real business or social movement. Students will hone ideas and objectives, write and present a business plan, develop and manage media campaigns, and design a business logo and website. Students will work with community members and representatives from Junior Achievement.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 11,12
Prerequisites: Application required
Final: None
*Offered every other year

Career Exploration Internship Program (CEIP)

CEIP is a one-year, unpaid internship. This course serves as a link between school and career. Students will gain an understanding of the importance of a positive work ethic and teamwork. Students are required to complete a written application, get recommendations, and have a personal interview. The application process is held in the spring of the preceding year. There are three different internships that are available to students. These options are described in detail below. In addition students must complete 27 to 54 hours of classroom instruction related to the internship.

Students who would like to be a part of this program must fill out and submit an application in spring prior to the school year during which they hope to intern. Each applicant must also be interviewed by the program coordinator. In addition, students must complete 27 to 54 hours of lab instruction related to the internship. Students are required to apply and interview for a CEIP program internship.

Credit: .5 to 1
Grades: 11,12
Prerequisites: None
Final: None

  • Trading Post: This internship includes working in all aspects of retail operation of the school bookstore. This includes buying, selling, promotions, cash controls, inventory controls, advertising and design. Business courses are recommended, however, not a prerequisite. The internship is scheduled within the normal school day. You would be asked to sign up to supervise a period 10 once every week or two. Additionally, you are requested to sign up to attend a few after school activities, i.e. Open House, Freshman Orientation, Sporting Contests, and Special Events. No transportation required.
  • First New York (FNY) Credit Union: This internship involves becoming an employee of the credit union. You apply to the program and go through a FNY interview. Once hired by FNY you attend an all day training seminar to be trained on bank teller and member service representative functions. The internship is on Thursdays when school is in session. Exact times will be determined. No transportation required.
  • Outside Placement: This internship is a placement outside of school and, in most cases, outside the normal school hours. It is common for students to get an early release from school to go to an internship site if their schedule permits. Students work with mentors in their chosen area of interest for a minimum of 108 hours. Students are responsible for making connections with appropriate placements according to their area of interest. Family, friends, and neighbors often make great mentors. Additionally, the CEIP coordinator can assist with suggestions and will follow up with the mentor to explain the details of the program. Transportation is NOT provided by the school for the outside of school placements.

Cooperative Work Experience

This program is open to students who are at least 16 years old and who have obtained their own part-time job. Students must apply through the work experience coordinator. Students receive 0.5 credits for every 150 hours of work, with a maximum of two credits. Although all students are encouraged to pursue employment, this program is only for students who need the credit for graduation.
Credit: 0.5-2.0
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: None
Final: None
* One credit can be used toward business sequence.

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Criminal Justice

The Criminal Justice Program has been designed for Mohonasen students interested in pursuing careers related to criminal justice and law enforcement. It prepares students to enter post-secondary education in these fields or go straight to the work force. Possible careers related to this program include: law enforcement at local, state or federal levels, court or security officer, corrections or environmental officer, military police officer, bail enforcement agent, private investigator, forensic technician among others. Students who successfully complete both Criminal Justice I and II may be eligible to receive up to six college credits at Schenectady County Community College.

Course Offerings

Introduction to Criminal Justice – Year 1

Provides the philosophical and historical background of law enforcement and analyzes the components of the criminal justice system, including the police, courts and corrections.
Credit: 1.0
Grades: 11,12
Prerequisite: Application
Other: Must be taken with Criminal Science
*Registration priority given to juniors

Criminal Science – Year 1

This course is a survey of a crime laboratory. It looks at the role of the lab in criminal investigations including firearms identification, examination of documents, criminal analysis, and fingerprinting.
Credit: 1.0
Grades: 11,12
Prerequisite: Application
Other: Must be taken with Introduction to Criminal Justice
*Registration priority given to juniors

Introduction to Criminal Justice II – Year 2

This course builds on the foundation of year one of the program. Students will also have the opportunity to further research and explore the law enforcement career area of their choice.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Criminal Justice I and instructor approval.

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Emerging Technologies/CTE Engineering

Emerging technologies are those technical innovations which represent progressive developments within a field for competitive advantage; converging technologies represent previously distinct fields which are in some way moving towards stronger inter-connection and similar goals. They are technologies which arise from new knowledge, or the innovative application of existing knowledge; they lead to the rapid development of new capabilities; they are projected to have significant systemic and long-lasting economic, social and political impacts.

By completing Mohonasen’s Technology – Engineering CTE Pathway, students can receive a CTE designation on their diploma AND learn valuable college and career skills. In some cases, a CTE pathway can also be used to meet a graduation requirement.

Mohonasen Technology – CTE Engineering

Introduction to Technology and Trades:  (ITT – DDP)

This introductory course is designed to give students an overview of the various areas of technology and trade skills. In addition, students will explore some of the various career options related to the course, along with the preparations needed to make in order to pursue them beyond high school. Students will cover fundamental skills in the design process, sketching, measuring and marking, career readiness, and planning and production. Some of the course trade skills include: construction, electricity and electronics, manufacturing, metal fabrication, woodworking, and others. Furthermore, students will have an opportunity to make multiple industry and worksite visits to get an up close and personal look at the operations involved.

Credit: 1
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None
Final: Exam/Project
Lab Fee: yes
Meets Art/Music requirement for graduation

Introduction to Engineering Design (IED-DDP) (PLTW)

This introductory course is designed to give students an overview of the various areas of technology and engineering  skills. The theme of the course is the use of systemic design process to develop creative solutions to many types of problems.  Students will develop skills in creative problem solving, 3D sketching, industrial design, teamwork, and presentation skills.  State of the art computer aided design (CAD) software is used.  Students will spend a large percent of their time creating computer models.  Throughout the course, math and science concepts are used to arrive at the best solution to design problems.  Students will develop skills in creating prototypes or models of their designs.  Students will learn safely and accurately use a variety of hand tools and machines to produce prototypes of their designs,  Projects include past inventions, creating 3D models, and designing products that can be manufactured.

Credit: 1
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: none
Final: none
College Credit: 3 SCCC credits or 3 credits through RIT by passing the PLTW Exam
Meets the Art/Music requirement for graduation
Lab Fee: yes

Computer Integrated Manufacturing (PLTW)

This course introduces students to the world of advanced manufacturing. Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) is the study of manufacturing planning, integration and implementation of automation. Students will study the history of manufacturing, process and control systems, rapid prototyping, programming techniques, computer controlled machining and industrial robot design. Various machines will be used to create actual parts from their 3-D designs

Credit: 1
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Pre-requested: ITT or IED
Final: Exam
College Credit: 3 credits through RIT  by passing PLTW Exam.
Lab Fee

Robotics

This course is an introduction to robotics using the Arduino, SeaPerch and VEX robotics systems. The main objective of the course is to develop skills in the design, build and testing of robots that solve real world problems. Projects can include designing, making and programming robots for performing real world applications such as mobile robots for rough terrain, dangerous situations, search and rescue missions, surgical procedures and prosthetic limbs. Students who complete the robotics class will be well prepared to be programmers on the high school robotics team.

Credit: 1
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: ITT or IED
Final: Exam/Project

Principles of Engineering (PLTW)

This is a broad-based survey course designed to help students gain better understanding about careers in engineering and engineering technology.  The main goal of the course is to experience, through theory and hands on problem solving activities what engineering is all about and to answer the question. “Is a career in engineering or engineering technology for me?” This course reinforces problem solving communication and teamwork skills.  Projects include building and testing a “Rube Goldberg” machine, a bridge structure, a computer controlled machine and working with GE engineers to solve an energy problem. Students are required to write two technical research papers related to branches of engineering and technical failures in engineering.

Credit: 1|
Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: ITT or IED
Final : Exam
College Credit: 3 credits through RIT  by passing PLTW Exam
Lab Fee

Aerospace Engineering (PLTW)

This course is designed to offer students a better understanding about careers in aerospace engineering and aerospace technology.  Students gain this experience through developing creative problem solving skills, communication skills and teamwork skills.  Mathematical and scientific skills are integrated into all activities.  Projects include research and class presentation on the history of flying vehicles, computer simulation programs developed by NASA to design wings and model rockets, design, build and test a wing section using a wing tunnel; learn to navigate  using a flight simulator, design build and test glider plans, a g-force simulator and a microgravity drop tower and much more.

Credit: 1
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: ITT or IED
Final : Exam
Lab Fee

Engineering Design and Development: (PLTW)

This course is an engineering research course in which students work in teams to research and design and construct a solution to an open ended engineering problem.  Students apply principles developed in preceding courses and are guided by a community mentor.  Students submit progress reports and a final written report as well as defend their solutions to a panel of outside reviewers at the end of the school year.

Credit: 1
Grade 12
Prerequisite: ITT or IED, must be a fourth technology credit
Final: Project
Lab fee: yes

Manufacturing Systems  I

This is an introductory course designed to offer a broad-based view of how people change or process materials.  Students will complete a variety of projects using various tools and machines to teach them the fundamentals of manufacturing processing.  Activities including Casting and Molding – Permanent Mold Techniques, Forming – Plastics, Hot and cold forming metals and ceramic materials.  Students will be using 3-D solid modeling software, injection molders, vacuum formers, 3-D printers, metal working tools, drill press, bandsaw, lathe, milling machine, and  welding equipment.  This course provides valuable experiences to students interested in a manufacturing career.

Credit: 0.5
Grades: 10,11,12
Prerequisite: ITT or IED
Final: Project
Lab fee: yes

Manufacturing II

This course will extend the concepts and techniques learned in Manufacturing Systems II.  Students will  focuses on the tools and processing used in the manufacture of products.  Students will have the opportunity to learn about and apply techniques from the following content areas: Separating, Basic Layout Tools and Procedures, Precision Measurement, Sawing, Broaching, and Filing , Turning and Related Operations, Milling and Related Operations, Shaping and Planning Metals, Drilling, Boring, Reaming, and Tapping , Abrasive, Shearing.  Students will develop advanced machining skills and relate them to mathematical and scientific concepts.

Credit: .5
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: ITT or IED
Final: Project
Lab fee: yes

Production and Construction I

This course focuses on production activities.  Two major production categories are covered – manufacturing and construction.  Manufacturing is the production of any object or material in a factory.  Construction is the production or assemble of material on site.  Approximately 75 percent of class time is dedicated to hand-on activities using a variety of tools.  Students will design, investigate, research and construct objects in both woodworking and metal fabrication.  Sample projects in Adirondack chairs, Shaker furniture, chess boards, and metal shelf brackets.

Credit: .5
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: ITT or IED
Final: Project
Lab fee: yes

Production and Construction II

The course is designed to give students some knowledge on how buildings are constructed.  Included in the course will be planning of a house, including cost estimation, foundation (includes footings) siding (wood and vinyl) roofing and electrical and plumbing codes.  A storage shed will be constructed and erected.  Other examples of projects include stair design, pipe fittings, electrical layout, framing and roofing.

Credit: .5
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: ITT or IED
Final: Project
Lab fee: yes

Introduction to Residential Systems

This course is designed to introduce topics in the home such as: residential wiring, plumbing and heating, ventilation & air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Through experiment, construction and problem solving based instruction students will be able to solve basic elements common to all residential systems.

Credit: .5
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Final:exam
Lab: Fee

Nanotechnology I

This course is designed to introduce students to the rapidly advancing field of nanotechnology and its applications. Basic chemistry and physics topics will be covered as they relate to nanotechnology. Students will be exposed to an introduction of the study of materials: metals, ceramics, polymers, and electronic materials. Students will investigate the relationship between bonding, structure, and properties of these materials. At the end of the year, students will appreciate the underlying principles of size-dependent properties and the processing and fabrication of these materials at the molecular level. This course incorporates lectures, guest lecturers, use of computers, lab work and student projects.

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: One year science
Final: Exam
Lab fee: Yes
College Credit: 3 CHS credits through SCCC

Nanotechnology II

This course introduces students to the field of nanoscale materials. Nanoscale materials have chemical and physical properties that are significantly different from those of bulk materials. Students will be able to recognize the underlying principles of the resulting size-dependent properties and the processing and fabrication of these materials at the molecular level. This course will cover the synthesis and assembly of nanoscale materials based on top-down and bottom-up approaches. The applications of nanodevices made from nanoscale materials will also be discussed. This course incorporates lectures, guest speakers, the use of computers, lab work and student projects.

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: Nanotechnology I
Final: Exam or Project
Lab Fee: Yes

College Credit: 3 CHS credits through SCCC

Mechanical Systems Control (Mechatronics I)

This course covers the basic components in a complex mechanical system.  Students will learn about  variable speed motor control, programmable-controllers, ultrasonic measurement, constant speed motors, electronic sensors, stepper motors, fiber optics, DC motors and robotics. Students are required to perform several industrial oriented tasks that lead to the successful production of an industrial product.

Credit: .5
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: ITT or IED
Final: Exam
4 CHS credits through SCCC

Hydraulic and Pneumatic Systems Controls (Mechatronics II)

This course is a study of fluid power technology using fluids or compressed air as the transfer media.  Complete hydraulic and pneumatic systems are studies including power sources, reservoirs, pumps, compressors, lines, valves and actuators.  Students will learn troubleshooting strategies to identify, localize and correct malfunctions.  Preventative maintenance and safety issues will also be discussed.

Credit: .5
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:Mechanical Systems Control (Mechatronics I)
Final: Exam
3 CHS credits through SCCC

Discovering Computer Science

This course is designed as an introduction to computer science for high school students who want to express themselves creatively and solve problems that are interesting to them using computational devices. This course is designed for students that have little or no experience studying computer science. Through a series of engaging, hands-on labs and projects, students learn the fundamentals of computer programming using the block-based language Snap! Students will also study the world wide web, designing and creating their own website using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. Finally, students will explore drawing, animation, and problem solving using Python. Throughout the course, computing history and current events in computer science will be incorporated. Special topics in computer science such as encryption, human-computer interaction, rapid prototyping, and others may be explored.

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 9,10,11,12
Prerequisite: Successful completion of CC Regents Algebra I and concurrent enrollment in CC Regents Geometry (w/ or w/out lab) or Core Geometry.
Final: None

Computer Science

This course is designed as an introduction to a range of topics in computer science. Through a series of engaging, hands-on projects, students will begin their study of web design and computer programming. The application and limits of computing will be explored through current topics in computing that are also relevant to high school students. An emphasis will be placed on developing problem-solving and computational thinking skills. (Note: This class is also listed under Emerging Technologies.)

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 10,11,12
Prerequisite: Successful completion of CC regents Geometry
Final: Exam

College Credit: 3 credits (Through Siena College)

Introduction to Software Development

This course is designed to continue a student’s introduction to the academic discipline of Computer Science. Course objectives include developing a student’s ability to create programming solutions, to translate algorithmic solutions to a Java implementation, to acquire knowledge about computing systems in general, and to enhance a student’s problem-solving abilities.

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 11,12
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Computer Science; or successful completion of Common Core Algebra II with teacher recommendation or Precalculus.
College Credit: 4 credits (Through Siena College)

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Family & Consumer Sciences (CTE)

The FACS (Family and Consumer Science) program helps students become competent and self-reliant in managing their personal, family, and work lives. It is designed to meet the needs of students interested in careers in education, childcare, health and consumer services, counseling, social work, dietetics and nutrition education.

Mohonasen Pathway for Human Services & Education

By completing Mohonasen’s Early Childhood Education CTE Pathway, students can receive a CTE Endorsement on their diploma AND learn valuable college and career skills. In some cases, a CTE pathway can also be used to meet graduation requirements.

Independent Living

This course focuses on the various ways the adolescent’s future is affected by personal and career goals, community involvement and personal relationships, the way they manage finances to reach personal financial goals, knowing their consumer rights and responsibilities, the way they manage daily housing, food, clothing and transportation costs.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None
Final: Exam
*Satisfies the CFM requirement for CTE Pathway

Lifespan Studies Core

Lifespan Studies focuses on skills needed for understanding relationships across the lifecycle. Strategies for understanding self, as well as for dealing with change, helps students cope with the challenges of living in today’s world. Students armed with these coping strategies are more likely to be involved in positive relationships in their family, school, community and workplace.This course relates to careers in human services. Activities include movies, interviews, and a lifespan project.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None
Final: Exam/Project

Child Psychology I

This course focuses on the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development during the prenatal, infant, and toddler stages of life. This course relates to careers in human services and education. Activities include movies, creating a pregnancy resource book, designing a toddler play project, as well as child observations and projects.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None
Final: Project/Exam
Required for CTE Pathway

Child Psychology II

Child Psych II links to Child Psych I and focuses on the physical, social, emotional and cognitive development during the preschool and school-age stages of life. Related to careers in human services and education. Activities include movies, creating a preschool play project, and 10 hours of child observations.
Credit: .5
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Child Psychology I (may be waived with teacher approval)
Final: Project/Exam
Required for CTE Pathway

Parenting

This course focuses on learning an active approach to parenting. It will help students clarify their own goals for the future and teach effective methods for leading children throughout the stages of life. Projects include: Flour Baby, Parent Interviews, Children Storybook and the Real Care Baby Project.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None
Final: Exam/Project

Adolescent Psychology

Students will explore the transition between childhood and adulthood that pose many changes and challenges during adolescence. They will come to understand the importance of identity formation and autonomy during adolescence. Students will recognize responsible personal and social behaviors in home, school, work, and community settings. The purpose of this content topic is to broaden students’ understanding of their roles and responsibilities as members of family and peer groups, and school, work, local, and global communities.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None
Final: Exam
*Offered every other year

Food & Nutrition

This course is designed to help students understand nutrition, as well as learn basic culinary skills. Students will research the USDA food guide, comparison shop, and plan and prepare nutritious meals. This course relates to careers in culinary arts, dietetics and nutritional education.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: None
Final: Project

Introduction to Early Childhood Education

This course provides an in–depth study of early childhood education. Students will gain knowledge in the history of early childhood education, curriculum writing skills, developmental theory, and application of theory. Activities include movies, child observations, child development position statements and collaborative service learning project.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 10,11,12
Prerequisite: Child Psychology
Final: Exam/Project
College Credit: 3 CHS credits through SCCC
Required for CTE Pathway

Education Career Exploration Internship Program (CEIP)

This is a one-year, non-paid, 108-hour internship. It is a link between school and careers involving the education of children. Students are placed with a classroom teacher in Bradt Primary School, Pinewood Elementary School, or Draper Middle School. Students will experience all aspects of the teaching profession. They will be able to improve their teamwork, leadership, and human relation skills. Students will fill out time sheets, journals, and work on related activities, such as a resume, mock interview and portfolio project. Students wishing to be a part of this program must fill out and submit an application. Each applicant also must be interviewed by the program coordinator. The internship is scheduled during the school day and transportation is provided. In addition students must complete 54 hours of classroom instruction related to the internship.
Credit: 1
Grades: 11,12
Prerequisite: Child Psychology I
Final: Portfolio
*Course is Pass/Fail
Required for CTE Pathway

Childhood Education Cooperative Work Experience

This program is open to students who have obtained their own part-time job. Students must apply through the work experience coordinator. Students receive 0.5 credits for every 150 hours of work, supported by related in-school instruction in a FACS career & technical discipline. Although all students are encouraged to pursue employment, this program is only for students who need the credit for graduation.
Credit: .5–2
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: CEIP
Final: None
*Course is Pass/Fail

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Media Arts

This program is designed for students interested in pursuing careers related to video production, music production, video editing, communications, journalism, broadcasting, theater arts, film, scriptwriting, acting, graphic design and a variety of other careers. It gives students practical, hands-on opportunities to learn about the equipment and processes related to the careers above as well as involvement in a variety of projects that benefit the Mohonasen School Community.

Course Offerings

Media Arts and Live Production

Students will engage in a creative workshop where they will be guided through the creative process from inception to completion in varied aspects of media arts. Each student will be asked to explore the creative process and utilize their creativity to create short movies, documentaries, news clips, music videos and varied other genres. They will review and critique different forms of modern media, including, but not limited to, newspapers, magazines, websites, blogs, social media, television, advertising and marketing, radio and public relations. Students will also be exposed to the technical elements relating to media writing, digital photography, digital video, digital music and the editing and production process. Students will learn the art of storytelling from the story idea, through interviewing, researching and the creation of digital media projects. They will practice basic interviewing skills and explore ethical concerns of journalists in our society. Students will also explore issues relating to privacy, consumerism, artistic/creative expression and media ownership through their own creative works.
Credit: 1.0
Grades: 10,11,12
Students may take course a second time for credit with instructor approval.

Independent Study – Media Arts

Senior students who have continued to show an interest in the field and a high level of motivation and responsibility are eligible for a senior independent study in any Media Arts production course. Students taking part in these classes either complete projects on an individual basis or with a group of other media arts students. Students are required to apply for and propose their project/internship plan. These projects/internships are overseen by the appropriate Media Arts instructors
Credit: 1.0
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: Instructor Recommendation

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Medicine & Health

The medicine and health program is oriented toward students who are interested in careers in health, nutrition, physical education, and sports science.

Course Offerings

Foundations of Sports Medicine

Foundations of Sports Medicine is a one-semester course. The course will cover the introduction to college level exercise science, kinesiology, and anatomy & physiology. This class is intended for juniors & seniors who are interested in athletic training, physical therapy, and the treatment of injuries. Functional movement, nutrition, and rehabilitation will be explored within the context of sports performance. The class is meant to cultivate interest in the field of health sciences.

Credit: .5
Grades: 11,12
Prerequisite: Health with at least 85 average and Living Environment with at least 80 average
Final: Exam/Project

Dimensions of Fitness and Sport

This advanced physical education course is designed to introduce students to the latest trends and career pathways in the sports and fitness worlds.  This course will focus on health-related fitness and lifelong sports units and activities.  Many different career pathways in these fields will be explored.  Health-related fitness units will involve exercise activities that are done in order to try to improve physical health and improve longevity.  Activities will be focused on improving cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility and body composition. In addition to these units students will perform various group fitness activities. Upon conclusion of these units students will be able to design and implement a personalized workout plan. Students will also participate in various lifetime sports and activities. During these units students will be able to develop a higher understanding of each sport and focus on strategies and game play, teaching cues, tournament setup and execution, and facilities management.  Students will be graded on a high standard of daily participation, keeping an accurate notebook, quarterly quizzes, and projects.

Credit: .5
Grades: 11,12
Prerequisite: Health
Final: Determined by Instructor
Satisfies the PE requirement for the year (full year course)

Program Facilitator

The District Director of Physical Education, Athletics & Health Education serves as the Program Facilitator for the Medicine & Health program.

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Music

The goal of the music department is to give students the opportunity to find a richer life by guiding them to a better understanding of music. There are valuable courses offered in several areas of music. All students, regardless of skill level, are encouraged to participate.

Course Offerings

Band

Enrollment in band requires participation in both Concert Band and Marching Band. Concert Band entails the study and experience in repertoire and performance, including preparation and presentation of assemblies and concerts. Marching Band entails experience in marching techniques, including presentation and preparation at all home football games, pep rallies, parades, and field shows. All members will receive instrumental lessons one period per week throughout the school year. Outstanding students will be selected for placement in the following groups on a non–credit, extracurricular basis: Select Band, Stage Band, Ensembles, Participation in Suburban Scholastic Council music functions, and participation in NYSSMA solo competition, Area All–State, and All-State Bands.
Credit: 1
Grades: 9,10,11,12
Prerequisite: None
Final: None
Students are encouraged to attend summer camps.

Orchestra

Membership in Orchestra includes the study of standard repertoire, techniques of concert performance, and orchestral routines. All members are required to attend instrumental lessons one period per week. Orchestra students participate in winter and spring concerts in addition to the Strawberry Festival and outside community performances. Outstanding students will be able to apply to NYSSMA, Suburban Council, and Area All-State. Students in High School Orchestra also are eligible to compete in a national music competition held in the spring.
Credit: 1
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None
Final: None

Select Orchestra

This is a non–credit, extra-curricular organization. Select Orchestra is an ensemble for advanced orchestra members. Members are selected through auditions held in the spring semester for the following fall term. Students in Select Orchestra are asked to prepare a solo piece of a NYSSMA level 3 or higher in addition to three major scales in two octaves. Students interested in joining Select Orchestra are encouraged to participate in Select Orchestra Summer Camp held during summer break. Select Orchestra performs for several functions during the school year and also attends a National Music Competition. This is a wonderful experience for students that are looking to get more exposure to chamber orchestra literature and to perform throughout the community.
Credit: None
Grades: 9,10,11,12
Prerequisite: Audition
Final: None
Students are encouraged to attend summer camps.

Choir

Choir is a credit-bearing ensemble with membership based on instructor recommendation and/or audition. Members perform a wide variety of vocal repertoire and learn appropriate vocal technique and reading skills. All ensemble members are required to attend one 40 minute vocal lesson per week. Outstanding ensemble members will be encouraged to audition for Select Choir, Suburban Council and All County music festivals and to participate in NYSSMA. The choir performs at school concerts and assemblies, the Strawberry Festival and select competitions.
Credit: 1
Grades: 9,10,11,12
Prerequisite: Teacher approval or audition
Final: None

Select Choir

This is a non-credit, extra-curricular organization. It is a highly select group of choir members who are advanced both musically and vocally. Members are selected through auditions. The group performs at civic functions, concerts, and assemblies. Students also participate in Suburban Scholastic Council music functions, NYSSMA solo competitions, Area All–State, and All–State choirs.
Credit: None
Grades: 9,10,11,12
Prerequisite: None
Final: None

Music Theory

Music Theory is the study of written music and how it is structured. The objective of the course is to foster a more sophisticated level of musicianship and to prepare the serious music student for higher education in competitive music programs. The course incorporates theory, sight-reading and solfege, ear training, composition, music history, and music technology.
Credit: 1
Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: Students must demonstrate intermediate-level ability to read music and belong to a school music ensemble. Students not involved in an ensemble must get permission from the instructor.
Final: Exam
*Required for a music sequence.
*College Credit: 3 CHS credits through SCCC

Music and Media Arts Appreciation

Music and Media Arts Appreciation is an introduction to media arts applications and the study of music from a listener’s point of view. The class is a combination of technology, music in our lives, and beginning music skills.
Students will learn how to “make beats,” create and edit movies and photography, and have the opportunity to learn basic guitar and piano. Topics in music appreciation include the history of rock and roll and world music. The class is a prerequisite for Music Production and takes place in the Music Lab at the Center for Advanced Technology.

Credit: 1
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisite : None
Final: Exam

Music Production I & II

This course is focused on the creation and production of music for both live events and studio productions. This includes music for albums, streaming audio, podcasts, TV shows/commercials, radio shows/commercials, concerts, plays, and other school events. In addition, students learn basic music theory, guitar, and piano skills. Students in Music Production II will have the opportunity to take part in more advanced music projects and production work, much of it self-directed. Students may study Music Production a third year as an independent study. These students will either complete a project OR complete an internship in a media arts field. Independent study projects may be completed on an individual basis or with a group of media arts students.
Credit: 1.0
Grades: 11,12,
Prerequisite: Music Appreciation or participation in a music ensemble

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