main content starts hereEnglish

The English program at Mohonasen Central School District is designed to help students reach a level of competency in the New York State Learning Standards for English/Language Arts. This includes students being able to read, write, listen, and speak for: information and understanding; literacy response and expression; critical analysis and evaluation; and social interaction. Development of the use of the writing process and a variety of both classic and contemporary literature will be the primary vehicles for meeting and exceeding these standards.

Course Offerings

English 9 | English 9 AIS

The emphasis in this course is on language skills: grammar, vocabulary, usage, mechanics, basic composition, reading skills, and basic literacy forms are studied. Students will write for a variety of audiences and purposes and they will learn how to write literary essays, reviews, summaries, and descriptions. They will review techniques for the research process and produce a multiple–source paper. There will be practice in formal and informal speech. Literature is taught by genre: novel, short story, poetry, and drama. Students will read selections from classic mythology, To Kill a Mockingbird, and Romeo and Juliet, among other texts.
Credit: 1
Grade: 9
Prerequisite: None
Final: Exam

English 9 Honors

The purpose of this course is to offer students an opportunity for enriched studies. Students will complete a number of individual projects and prepare presentations in addition to the work of the core curriculum. Composition is at an advanced level and independent research is required. Emphasis is on excellence of thought and expression. The course is designed to build knowledge, enhance comprehension skills, develop abstract thought processes, and hone critical-thinking skills. A special focus is placed on classical Greek literature.
Credit: 1 Grade: 9
Prerequisite: None
Final: Exam

English 9 Interdisciplinary

This interdisciplinary course integrates themes in Global History and literature as students develop a keen awareness of the cultural richness of China, India, Japan, Greece, Rome, Europe and Africa. While completing this course, students will explore common themes in literature of the regions through readings, presentations, creative writing, and research projects. There is an emphasis on both small and large-scale projects.
Credit: 1
Grades: 9
Prerequisite: None
Final: Exam
* Students must enroll in Global History 9I and English 9I concurrently.

English 10 | English 10 AIS

English 10 builds upon and extends the work of the previous year. Grammar emphasizes sentence structure and word order, complex sentences and phrases, and clause modifiers. Students review Regents tasks 1 and 3 and learn how to write tasks 2 and 4. They also practice more advanced research
skills for multiple-source papers. Literature units introduce comparison and contrast of genres and subjects. These include The Tempest, Of Mice and Men, Animal Farm, as well as poetry and short stories. Emphasis is placed on analysis, interpretation, and concept development.
Credit: 1
Grades: 10
Prerequisite: English 9 or English 9 Honors or English 9 Interdisciplinary
Final: Exam

English 10 Honors

In addition to the English 10 Regents course work, students will be required to do extensive independent reading and writing.
Credit: 1
Grades: 10
Prerequisite: English 9 or English 9 Honors or English 9 Interdisciplinary
Final: Exam

English 10 Interdisciplinary

This interdisciplinary course explores themes in Global History and literature as students are involved in a comprehensive study of Western and Eastern civilization from the Enlightenment to contemporary times. The course presents the concept of civilization as a cumulative “tapestry” of social, political, religious, economic, and artistic components. While completing this course, students will explore common themes in literature of the regions through reading, presentations, creative writing and research projects. Projects include a variety of writing assignments, project-based activities, and presentations.
Credit: 1
Grades: 10
Prerequisite: English 9 or English 9 Honors or English 9 Interdisciplinary
Final: Exam
* Students must enroll in Global History 10 Interdisciplinary and English 10 Interdisciplinary concurrently.

English 11 | English 11 AIS

The focus is on American literature, which is presented both thematically and chronologically. Students have the opportunity to experience the literature as well as the cultural and historical influences upon major novelists, poets, dramatists, and non–fiction writers. Language studies include regular vocabulary, grammar and usage, mastery of the comparison–contrast essay, resumes, and letter of application. Literary essays and a multiple–source research paper are required. Students are given intensive practice in listening intelligently and writing and speaking clearly, thoughtfully, and correctly. Required texts include Macbeth, The Crucible, Scarlet Letter, and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
Credit: 1
Grades: 11
Prerequisite: English 10 or English 10 Honors or English 10 Interdisciplinary
Final: Exam/Writing Project
*Students will take Regents Exam in June.

English 11 Honors

Besides the core curriculum of English 11, students will do an in–depth study and exposition. Increased mastery of English syntax, style, and vocabulary will be emphasized. Class activities include various critical approaches to the exploration of literature, including technique and structure. Students also will participate in reader–response writing and discussion.
Credit: 1
Grades: 11
Prerequisite: English 10 or English 10 Honors or English 10 Interdisciplinary
Final: Multi–Genre Writing Portfolio Project
*Students will take Regents Exam in June.

English 11 Interdisciplinary

This interdisciplinary course centers on the cooperative discovery of the themes in the history of the United States and American Literature including a focus on primary sources and nonfiction. Through examination of the development of the nation’s political, economic, diplomatic, cultural, and social institutions from the colonial period to the present, and the simultaneous reading of American literature from each time period students will be making connections between history, literature, and culture. There is a great emphasis on writing, vocabulary and grammar, reading independently, and preparing classroom presentations and projects, both individually and in groups.
Credit: 1
Grades: 11
Prerequisite: English 10 or English 10 Honors or English 10 Interdisciplinary
Final: Multi–Genre Writing Portfolio Project
* Students will take Regents Exam in June.
* Students must enroll in US History & Government Interdisciplinary and English 11 Interdisciplinary concurrently.

English 12

English 12 prepares all students for life after high school, whether they are headed to college or straight into the workforce. In this full-year course, students will further develop strong and sophisticated reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. Students will read some of the most studied literature of the English language, including short stories, poetry, graphic novels, essays and articles. Students will study works of both classic and modern writers and develop “every day” writing skills – working on college entrance essays, business letters and creative pieces. Class projects will allow students to select and explore a variety of written pieces and writing styles based on their interests.
Credit: 1
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: English 11 or English 11 Honors or English 11 Interdisciplinary or English AIS

AP English Literature and Composition

This rigorous and demanding course is designed for serious students of literature who are planning to enter college. AP English engages students in the
careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through close reading of selected literary works, students deepen their understanding and enhance their pleasure in literature. To achieve these goals, students study individual works, their characters, action, structure, and language. Students are exposed to both large–scale literary elements, such as form and theme, and smaller scale elements, such as figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. A high level of verbal competence and skill in writing is required, as well as the ability of sustained independent inquiry.
Credit: 1
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: English 11 or English 11 Honors or English 11 Interdisciplinary
Final: Research Paper
*AP Exam is taken in May.

English 123: College Composition

College composition is an intensive study in the method, forms and style of composition, and in detailed analysis of the writing process. Students will acquire a foundation in the writing process by developing effective communication skills with an emphasis on expository writing, particularly the essay. Students will write a minimum of 24 evaluated pieces, including a documented piece of writing. They also will deliver an oral presentation.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 12
Prerequisites: English 11 or English 11 Honors or English 11 Interdisciplinary and at least a 75 on the English Regents Exam
Final: Research Paper/Oral Presentation
College Credit: 3 CHS credits through SCCC

English 124: Introduction to Literature

This course introduces students to the interpretation of literature and the examination of literary genres, devices, and critical theory. Students read and discuss short fiction, drama, and poetry. Organizational pattern and composition techniques studied in English 123 are strengthened and refined by applying them to writing essays about assigned readings.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 12
Prerequisites: English 123: College Composition
Final: Research Paper/Exam/Oral Presentation
College Credit: 3 CHS credits through SCCC

Language and the Arts: Film as Literature

This course will examine classic and contemporary cinema as a modern “literary” form. Through an exploration of a variety of films, students will develop a better understanding of the art form and its place in the contemporary world. Students will be expected to complete occasional reading assignments in conjunction with the study of various films. Assessments will include a variety of writing assignments including critical and analytical essays, movie reviews, creative writing, personal response, screenplay excerpts, etc. Consistent attendance is critical for success in the course as most films will be viewed in class. Absences will require the completion of separate, substitute assignments. Class participation and active, alert viewing participation will amount to 20 percent of the final grade. Film lists will vary from semester to semester. Parental permission is required as some of the films will be rated R. Possible R–rated titles will include, but are not limited to, The Graduate (1967), Do the Right Thing (1989), and Crash (1984).
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: English 11 or English 11 Honors or English 11 Interdisciplinary
Final: Exam

Media & Society

This course will look at how media and society are influenced by each other by looking at major media events of the last century through multiple communication models. Students will watch, read, and listen to rebroadcasts of events and analyze how coverage impacts the viewer/listener and how the viewer/listener impacts coverage. The course will also look at how technological advances have influenced coverage and storytelling while bringing the viewer/listener into the process.
Credit: .5
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: English 11 or English 11 Honors or English 11 Interdisciplinary
Final: Project/Exam

Media Focus

This course guides students to become active viewers and producers of media. They learn to understand the language of film, to analyze commercials and political ads, and to interpret the visual messages and techniques used in TV news programs. After being given lessons and demonstrations with all necessary equipment, the students will produce their own assignment using individual ingenuity and creativity.
Credit: .5
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: English 11 or English 11 Honors or English 11 Interdisciplinary
Final: 25 Page Script

Sports Journalism

This course is writing intensive, focusing on modeling the style used specifically for sports articles and broadcasts, including use of blogs and tweets. Students will examine the various aspects of sports media, getting a behind the scenes look at such topics as interviewing athletes and coaches, how to choose and cover sporting events, and how to cover these by both speaking publicly and through digital media. Success in Sports Journalism is dependent on the completion of many articles, response journals, written and visual media projects, and research-based assignments.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: English 11 or English 11 Honors or English 11 Interdisciplinary

Theater I

Primarily directed toward performance, this course is intended for the student who is interested in theater as a unique craft. The curriculum includes training in special skills related to theater performance and production. Students study the means of creating and producing drama as they engage in individual and group theatrical and theater–related tasks. The course covers stage language, voice and diction, stage movement, character, analysis, and the fundamentals of play production.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: English 11 or English 11 Honors or English 11 Interdisciplinary
Final: Paper/Performance

Theater II

This course continues skill development for theater, but delves more deeply into aspects of play production, such as setting, lighting, costuming, and makeup. Students are encouraged to take Theater I, but it is not a prerequisite.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: English 11 or English 11 Honors or English 11 Interdisciplinary
Final: Paper/Performance

Public Speaking

This course provides students an opportunity to develop an informed, proactive voice as citizens through the medium of speech. The class examines how speakers use language to affect audiences. Students explore and present speeches for a wide range of purposes and audiences. Oral presentations include speeches which entertain, inform, and persuade. Impromptu speeches and critical listening are required. The question addressed will be: How do individuals use oral language to affect audiences? Students are required to do peer and self-evaluations. Students who are intimidated by public speaking are encouraged to take this course to improve their confidence.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: English 11 or English 11 Honors or English 11 Interdisciplinary
Final: Project/Speech

Introduction to Philosophy

A survey course in the history of western philosophy incorporating a cross-disciplinary English-Social Studies approach. It employs a chronological look at the lives, ideas and cultural-historical backgrounds of the major philosophers that have impacted western history and thought. Students explore the central questions that have preoccupied philosophers and laymen alike. Students are required to think critically and form their own conclusions and “personal philosophies,” which they will articulate and defend. Sophie’s World, a novel by Jostein Gaarder, is used as the basic text. In this work, an inquisitive high school girl receives an anonymous and mysterious “course” in philosophy, which profoundly effects her life. This text will be supplemented with handouts and relative selections and samples of other texts. Assessments are frequent DYRT quizzes, HW completion, journal writing, quizzes and some formal tests. While not an “easy” course, the grading is heavily based on completion of specific reading and HW assignments.
Credit: 0.5
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: English 11 or English 11 Honors or English 11 Interdisciplinary
Final: Paper/Exam