main content starts hereEmerging Technologies/CTE Engineering

Emerging technologies are those technical innovations which represent progressive developments within a field for competitive advantage; converging technologies represent previously distinct fields which are in some way moving towards stronger inter-connection and similar goals. They are technologies which arise from new knowledge, or the innovative application of existing knowledge; they lead to the rapid development of new capabilities; they are projected to have significant systemic and long-lasting economic, social and political impacts.

By completing Mohonasen’s Technology – Engineering CTE Pathway, students can receive a CTE designation on their diploma AND learn valuable college and career skills. In some cases, a CTE pathway can also be used to meet a graduation requirement.

Mohonasen Technology – CTE Engineering

Introduction to Technology and Trades:  (ITT – DDP)

This introductory course is designed to give students an overview of the various areas of technology and trade skills. In addition, students will explore some of the various career options related to the course, along with the preparations needed to make in order to pursue them beyond high school. Students will cover fundamental skills in the design process, sketching, measuring and marking, career readiness, and planning and production. Some of the course trade skills include: construction, electricity and electronics, manufacturing, metal fabrication, woodworking, and others. Furthermore, students will have an opportunity to make multiple industry and worksite visits to get an up close and personal look at the operations involved.

Credit: 1
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None
Final: Exam/Project
Lab Fee: yes
Meets Art/Music requirement for graduation

Introduction to Engineering Design (IED-DDP) (PLTW)

This introductory course is designed to give students an overview of the various areas of technology and engineering  skills. The theme of the course is the use of systemic design process to develop creative solutions to many types of problems.  Students will develop skills in creative problem solving, 3D sketching, industrial design, teamwork, and presentation skills.  State of the art computer aided design (CAD) software is used.  Students will spend a large percent of their time creating computer models.  Throughout the course, math and science concepts are used to arrive at the best solution to design problems.  Students will develop skills in creating prototypes or models of their designs.  Students will learn safely and accurately use a variety of hand tools and machines to produce prototypes of their designs,  Projects include past inventions, creating 3D models, and designing products that can be manufactured.

Credit: 1
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: none
Final: none
College Credit: 3 SCCC credits or 3 credits through RIT by passing the PLTW Exam
Meets the Art/Music requirement for graduation
Lab Fee: yes

Computer Integrated Manufacturing (PLTW)

This course introduces students to the world of advanced manufacturing. Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) is the study of manufacturing planning, integration and implementation of automation. Students will study the history of manufacturing, process and control systems, rapid prototyping, programming techniques, computer controlled machining and industrial robot design. Various machines will be used to create actual parts from their 3-D designs

Credit: 1
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Pre-requested: ITT or IED
Final: Exam
College Credit: 3 credits through RIT  by passing PLTW Exam.
Lab Fee

Robotics

This course is an introduction to robotics using the Arduino, SeaPerch and VEX robotics systems. The main objective of the course is to develop skills in the design, build and testing of robots that solve real world problems. Projects can include designing, making and programming robots for performing real world applications such as mobile robots for rough terrain, dangerous situations, search and rescue missions, surgical procedures and prosthetic limbs. Students who complete the robotics class will be well prepared to be programmers on the high school robotics team.

Credit: 1
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: ITT or IED
Final: Exam/Project

Principles of Engineering (PLTW)

This is a broad-based survey course designed to help students gain better understanding about careers in engineering and engineering technology.  The main goal of the course is to experience, through theory and hands on problem solving activities what engineering is all about and to answer the question. “Is a career in engineering or engineering technology for me?” This course reinforces problem solving communication and teamwork skills.  Projects include building and testing a “Rube Goldberg” machine, a bridge structure, a computer controlled machine and working with GE engineers to solve an energy problem. Students are required to write two technical research papers related to branches of engineering and technical failures in engineering.

Credit: 1|
Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: ITT or IED
Final : Exam
College Credit: 3 credits through RIT  by passing PLTW Exam
Lab Fee

Aerospace Engineering (PLTW)

This course is designed to offer students a better understanding about careers in aerospace engineering and aerospace technology.  Students gain this experience through developing creative problem solving skills, communication skills and teamwork skills.  Mathematical and scientific skills are integrated into all activities.  Projects include research and class presentation on the history of flying vehicles, computer simulation programs developed by NASA to design wings and model rockets, design, build and test a wing section using a wing tunnel; learn to navigate  using a flight simulator, design build and test glider plans, a g-force simulator and a microgravity drop tower and much more.

Credit: 1
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: ITT or IED
Final : Exam
Lab Fee

Engineering Design and Development: (PLTW)

This course is an engineering research course in which students work in teams to research and design and construct a solution to an open ended engineering problem.  Students apply principles developed in preceding courses and are guided by a community mentor.  Students submit progress reports and a final written report as well as defend their solutions to a panel of outside reviewers at the end of the school year.

Credit: 1
Grade 12
Prerequisite: ITT or IED, must be a fourth technology credit
Final: Project
Lab fee: yes

Manufacturing Systems  I

This is an introductory course designed to offer a broad-based view of how people change or process materials.  Students will complete a variety of projects using various tools and machines to teach them the fundamentals of manufacturing processing.  Activities including Casting and Molding – Permanent Mold Techniques, Forming – Plastics, Hot and cold forming metals and ceramic materials.  Students will be using 3-D solid modeling software, injection molders, vacuum formers, 3-D printers, metal working tools, drill press, bandsaw, lathe, milling machine, and  welding equipment.  This course provides valuable experiences to students interested in a manufacturing career.

Credit: 0.5
Grades: 10,11,12
Prerequisite: ITT or IED
Final: Project
Lab fee: yes

Manufacturing II

This course will extend the concepts and techniques learned in Manufacturing Systems II.  Students will  focuses on the tools and processing used in the manufacture of products.  Students will have the opportunity to learn about and apply techniques from the following content areas: Separating, Basic Layout Tools and Procedures, Precision Measurement, Sawing, Broaching, and Filing , Turning and Related Operations, Milling and Related Operations, Shaping and Planning Metals, Drilling, Boring, Reaming, and Tapping , Abrasive, Shearing.  Students will develop advanced machining skills and relate them to mathematical and scientific concepts.

Credit: .5
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: ITT or IED
Final: Project
Lab fee: yes

Production and Construction I

This course focuses on production activities.  Two major production categories are covered – manufacturing and construction.  Manufacturing is the production of any object or material in a factory.  Construction is the production or assemble of material on site.  Approximately 75 percent of class time is dedicated to hand-on activities using a variety of tools.  Students will design, investigate, research and construct objects in both woodworking and metal fabrication.  Sample projects in Adirondack chairs, Shaker furniture, chess boards, and metal shelf brackets.

Credit: .5
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: ITT or IED
Final: Project
Lab fee: yes

Production and Construction II

The course is designed to give students some knowledge on how buildings are constructed.  Included in the course will be planning of a house, including cost estimation, foundation (includes footings) siding (wood and vinyl) roofing and electrical and plumbing codes.  A storage shed will be constructed and erected.  Other examples of projects include stair design, pipe fittings, electrical layout, framing and roofing.

Credit: .5
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: ITT or IED
Final: Project
Lab fee: yes

Basic Electricity/Electronics

Basic Electricity is a course that teaches electrical technologies in the home and in the industrial environment.  Through experiment, construction and problem solving based instruction students will be able to solve basic elements common to all technology systems.  Areas of study will be low voltage application, line voltage application, passage and active devices, law of electricity, how electricity is used in the world, different ways to produce electricity – construction of them and the components that make them up.

Credit .5
Grades 9(need to be co-enrolled in IED) 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite 9 (need to be co-enrolled in IED)
Final:exam
Lab: Fee

Nanotechnology I

This course is designed to introduce students to the rapidly advancing field of nanotechnology and its applications. Basic chemistry and physics topics will be covered as they relate to nanotechnology. Students will be exposed to an introduction of the study of materials: metals, ceramics, polymers, and electronic materials. Students will investigate the relationship between bonding, structure, and properties of these materials. At the end of the year, students will appreciate the underlying principles of size-dependent properties and the processing and fabrication of these materials at the molecular level. This course incorporates lectures, guest lecturers, use of computers, lab work and student projects.

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: One year science
Final: Exam
Lab fee: Yes
College Credit: 3 CHS credits through SCCC

Nanotechnology II

This course introduces students to the field of nanoscale materials. Nanoscale materials have chemical and physical properties that are significantly different from those of bulk materials. Students will be able to recognize the underlying principles of the resulting size-dependent properties and the processing and fabrication of these materials at the molecular level. This course will cover the synthesis and assembly of nanoscale materials based on top-down and bottom-up approaches. The applications of nanodevices made from nanoscale materials will also be discussed. This course incorporates lectures, guest speakers, the use of computers, lab work and student projects.

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: Nanotechnology I
Final: Exam or Project
Lab Fee: Yes

College Credit: 3 CHS credits through SCCC

Mechanical Systems Control (Mechatronics I)

This course covers the basic components in a complex mechanical system.  Students will learn about  variable speed motor control, programmable-controllers, ultrasonic measurement, constant speed motors, electronic sensors, stepper motors, fiber optics, DC motors and robotics. Students are required to perform several industrial oriented tasks that lead to the successful production of an industrial product.

Credit: .5
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: ITT or IED
Final: Exam
4 CHS credits through SCCC

Hydraulic and Pneumatic Systems Controls (Mechatronics II)

This course is a study of fluid power technology using fluids or compressed air as the transfer media.  Complete hydraulic and pneumatic systems are studies including power sources, reservoirs, pumps, compressors, lines, valves and actuators.  Students will learn troubleshooting strategies to identify, localize and correct malfunctions.  Preventative maintenance and safety issues will also be discussed.

Credit: .5
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:Mechanical Systems Control (Mechatronics I)
Final: Exam
3 CHS credits through SCCC

Emerging Technology CEIP

This internship is specifically designed for seniors in the technology department.  It is a 108 hour internship in a community placement.  Students are required to provide their own transportation for the offsite placements.  In addition students must complete 27 to 54 hours of classroom instruction related to the internship.  Students are required to apply and interview for a CEIP program internship.

Credit: .5-1.0
Grade 12

Computer Science

This course is designed as an introduction to a range of topics in computer science. Through a series of engaging, hands-on projects, students will begin their study of web design and computer programming. The application and limits of computing will be explored through current topics in computing that are also relevant to high school students. An emphasis will be placed on developing problem-solving and computational thinking skills. (Note: This class is also listed under Emerging Technologies.)

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 10,11,12
Prerequisite: Successful completion of CC regents Geometry
Final: Exam
College Credit: 3 credits through Siena College